Apple cider vinegar with mother for weight loss

Apple cider vinegar with mother for weight loss

First, let’s explore exactly what apple cider vinegar, or ACV, is. ACV is made from fermented apples and water. Like other vinegars, ACV has 5 percent acidity.

You may notice that there are different types of ACV available at the store. For instance, distilled ACV looks clear in the bottle, and it may be the one you’re most familiar with.  But raw, unfiltered or unpasteurized ACV contains a cloudy substance that floats around in the mix. This is called the “mother” and is formed by natural enzymes during fermentation. No need to be wary of it: This stringy substance usually settles to the bottom of the bottle; it’s also completely safe to consume.

Regardless of the variety, you do not have to refrigerate ACV, and it will last for a very long time.  Vinegar, in general, has an almost indefinite shelf life, according to The Vinegar Institute, an international trade association for vinegar manufacturers. Even if your vinegar changes appearance (it may look cloudier, for instance), it is still okay to be used.

The unfiltered and unrefined vinegar with cloudy and murky appearance is called apple cider vinegar with "mother". It is used for drinking purposes and has many health benefits due to the presence of beneficial bacteria, yeast and protein. When the culture of bacteria is removed during filtration and refining, it results in clear and transparent apple cider vinegar. The healing properties of vinegar are due to acetic acid and other beneficial compounds present in it.

 

ACV has garnered super food status, and fans of the vinegar say that it can cure nearly everything that ails you (weight gain, digestive issues, skin woes). Truth is, there are few studies that support these uses, so while you can add organic apple cider vinegar in  your diet without significantly upping your risk for weight gain, it’s best to stay realistic about it.

Weight Loss

One way ACV is weight loss friendly is it has very few calories. Yet you may also have heard that some people take a shot or tablespoon of apple cider vinegar for weight loss. The fact of the matter is, taking ACV will likely do little to actually change your body composition or weight. As registered dietitian Katherine Zeratsky points out for the Mayo Clinic, this thought doesn’t have scientific support behind it — and the only way to actually lose weight is through a generally healthy diet and by incorporating fitness into your routine. (6) The advice is far less flashy than supplementing with something as trendy as ACV, but it’s exactly what really works.

High Cholesterol

That said, there is some preliminary research suggesting that ACV may be beneficial for health. One animal study showed that obese rats who took apple cider vinegar daily saw a reduction in total cholesterol, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels due to its antioxidant benefits. (7) It’s important to note, though, that this study was done only on rats, so it’s not known if these findings hold up when applied to humans.

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